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Musica Ex Machina" is taken from Karl Bartos' latest album "Off The Record". The album's available on CD and Vinyl: http://shop.tapeterecords.com/karl-bartos-off-the-record.html

For tour dates also check http://karlbartos.com

Sound ON!

Karl Bartos - Musica Ex Machina on MUZU.TV.

Disney often presents a world in which animals can talk and it's usually all hunky-dory and hapyness. But what *if* they could talk for real?

Yay, topic humour I did for cracked... about last year... *cough*

Just toying around with some images...

After computers, telephones and pads Apple now also entered the architecture business, presenting the new:

If you want to move in there of you'll need new furniture. Of course from:

Now you might ask: Who's gonna live in such a lousy place? Easy:

... there now would be a remastered version with added effects:

This just in today:

OFF THE RECORD OUT NOW!

THE ALBUM "OFF THE RECORD"
For Off the Record, Karl Bartos has opened up his music archive for the very first time. He rediscovered and analysed hundreds of tapes, piles of sheet music, and years of digital media. Inspired by his acoustic diary and adding his experience as a composer and producer, he has created twelve brand new songs, written and performed with masterly skill.

It took him two years to accomplish this original Bartos album: iron crystal music, vocoder newspeak, robot sounds, digital glitch, techno pop, catchy melodies, electronic avant-garde, roaring silence, futurism, and, of course, those rhythms! Rhythms of brutal minimalistic impact as found on the much-sampled "Numbers" recorded three decades ago and described by Mike Banks of Underground Resistance as "the secret code of electronic funk".

SECOND SINGLE "WITHOUT A TRACE OF EMOTION"

What must it be like for an artist to live with the image of being a legend? Surely not the worst thing that can happen. But is it always a comfortable experience? This single, lifted from his new album "Off The Record" sees Karl Bartos reflect upon the creative period as a member of the legendary group Kraftwerk for the first time. He meets the showroom dummy Herr Karl, his alter ego, and they strike up a conversation. Bartos reveals a sharp sense of humour and self-irony through the film which accompanies the single, referencing every conceivable cliché of pop stardom: dress code, interviews, champagne, mirror image, persecution complex. Yet Herr Karl, as one might suspect, remains unwaveringly cool, "without a trace of emotion".

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